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How to find OEM/correct spark plugs?

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Offline JpHyundaiFan

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My i30 is: Hyundai i30 5d 1,6 GDI ISG Innovation 2013, 99,00kW
I tried to find recommended spark plugs from manual, but it does not mention it.
Is there any website to find it? The car part shops have a service where I can tell my model and they tell which are suitable, but can I trust them? Or can you recommend?

I noticed the part shop recommends "NGK SILZKR6B10E" which the NGK website also seems recommends.

And thanks so far, was able to change oil (created my own wooden ramps, if anybody wants to see I can send a pic) , change the filters and tires. Next planning to change spark plugs.

Or does spark plug change belong to professionals because they need adjusting (I saw a video which says that its best they are in a certain angle/position)?
  • Hyundai i30 1.6, Blue-Drive, GDH, Blueberry, 2013


Offline TerryT

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Any decent, large local spare parts shop should be able to reliably advise the spark plug part number for your model/year, so the NGK SILZKR6B10E plug is probably the correct plug (size and heat range).   But, to be sure, to be sure (if Irish), telephone Hyundai (Finland) or NGK (Finland) and speak to Technical Support.

If you have changed your engine oil and filters, I would say you could handle changing the spark plugs.  Watch a few YouTube videos posted by workshops-garages-mechanics on changing plugs on an i30 and how to gap spark plugs correctly, with the correct tool.  The plugs should be set correctly by the factory, but always double-check the gap before installing them.

You said: "...does spark plug change belong to professionals" [I say, No in your case!] "...because they need adjusting (I saw a video which says that its best they are in a certain angle/position)?"    I think the video is talking about spark plug indexing.  Google it.  (Basically, you spend a lot of time swearing and screwing the spark plug into the head to get the spark plug ground strap orientated a certain way in the combustion chamber, all to achieve a small power gain (1~2 horsepower?)  So, maybe for race cars but not, imo, for a 2013 street i30 Innovation...even though you said your car has 99,00kW (kilowatts?).  Really?  :D


  • 2018 i30 PD SR Auto 1.6 Turbo Hatch (Sparkling Metal)


Offline JpHyundaiFan

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You said: "...does spark plug change belong to professionals" [I say, No in your case!] "

Thanks for the advices! I study these and videos and want to try to do this. If I manage to do it, I can post results here :).
Yes, It was about " spark plug indexing".
  • Hyundai i30 1.6, Blue-Drive, GDH, Blueberry, 2013


Offline TerryT

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You said: "...does spark plug change belong to professionals" [I say, No in your case!] "

Thanks for the advices! I study these and videos and want to try to do this. If I manage to do it, I can post results here :).
Yes, It was about " spark plug indexing".


All good.  I suggest you especially watch videos from the spark plug manufacturers like NGK, Bosch, Champion, either on their web sites or on YouTube.

It will be mentioned ad nauseum in videos that your spark plug's centre electrode is fine wire Iridium (precious) metal...it is fragile!  Traditional non-precious spark plugs have a solid centre electrode of about 2.5mm dia whereas Iridium plugs have 0.6mm tips lasered to the centre electrode...a big difference. 

If you have to adjust the spark plug gap, avoid levering/pressing your gapping tool against the centre electrode to make the correct gap!  You will damage it and at AUD$35~$40 AUD per plug, you will cry!  If you have to close the plug gap, avoid the way shown in old videos of banging the earth strap against something hard like concrete floor...that worked once, not so much now with Iridium plugs. :) 

I usually try to remove and install spark plugs on a cold or cool engine, if I have the choice.

Tool Tip: If you don't have one, may I suggest you buy a spark plug socket fitted with a magnetic insert (or, at very least, a rubber insert).  The magnetic insert grips the spark plug around its single-hex (6) sides and helps you lift the spark plug out of its deep 'well' without dropping it.   My personal preference is a single-hex (6-sided) spark plug socket rather than a double-hex (12-sided) socket.  I think the socket size is 16mm (5/8").

One last thing, when starting the new plugs into the head, I suggest not using the ratchet with your extension bar & socket.  For more sensitivity against cross-threading, discard the ratchet and use your fingers on the extension bar to 'feel' that the plug is correctly starting the thread in the head.

Think that's enough from me. :)   


  • 2018 i30 PD SR Auto 1.6 Turbo Hatch (Sparkling Metal)


Offline PGN I30

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I stopped gapping plugs years ago, Ford wanted a 1.2mm gap, plugs came pregapped at 0.8, gappping them at a Ford recommended measurement would  strain coil packs in my opinion after one failed early, I left/checked them at 0.8 from then on.
When I was fitting iridium ones to the lads ST they were left at the gap out the box and worked perfectly.
As for Hyundai, I don't know, personally I would leave them as they came.


Offline TerryT

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An afterthought. 

If the spark plugs you buy have the terminal nuts loose in the box, you will need, of course, to screw the nuts onto the plug's end threads.  The tip: after screwing the nuts on finger tight, use small pliers (or grips, whatever) to gently nip up the nuts.  The important words here are "gently" and "nip up".   If you just screw the nut on finger tight you can bet at some stage the nut will vibrate loose and you will have ignition problems.  If you use too much force tightening up a nut, you will break off the end part off the plug...and you will cry tears!     

If the spark plugs you buy have the terminal nuts already fitted, I suggest you use small pliers to check that the nuts are tight on the thread.  Again, be gentle!


  • 2018 i30 PD SR Auto 1.6 Turbo Hatch (Sparkling Metal)


Offline JpHyundaiFan

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If the spark plugs you buy have the terminal nuts loose in the box, you will need, of course, to screw the nuts onto the plug's end threads. 

Ok good information. Surely can helps others also.

Do you think buying for example NKG brand is suitable for my car, or do I need to look for some "Genuine Hyundai"- brand?
  • Hyundai i30 1.6, Blue-Drive, GDH, Blueberry, 2013


Offline PGN I30

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Hyundai don't make spark plugs, they're rebranded, normally NGK or Denso.


Offline JpHyundaiFan

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If you have changed your engine oil and filters, I would say you could handle changing the spark plugs. 

Just finished changing the spark plugs. Model NGK SILZKR6B10E as was the plan. The car started and seemed to run normally after change, so seems like a success. The plug gap seems to be about 1mm (I measured all of them to ensure they all the same).

The only minor mistake is that the first spark plug I tightened to about 25 Ib-ft, even though recommendation seems to be 15-21. Then I noticed the mistake and others less than 20. But later I fixed it to 20.

Thanks again.
« Last Edit: September 02, 2023, 18:09:35 by JpHyundaiFan »
  • Hyundai i30 1.6, Blue-Drive, GDH, Blueberry, 2013


Offline TerryT

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If you have changed your engine oil and filters, I would say you could handle changing the spark plugs. 

Just finished changing the spark plugs. Model NGK SILZKR6B10E as was the plan. The car started and seemed to run normally after change, so seems like a success. The plug gap seems to be about 1mm (I measured all of them to ensure they all the same).

The only minor mistake is that the first spark plug I tightened to about 25 Ib-ft, even though recommendation seems to be 15-21. Then I noticed the mistake and others less than 20. But later I fixed it to 20.

Thanks again.

Thanks for the feedback.  Glad to hear it went well for you.
  • 2018 i30 PD SR Auto 1.6 Turbo Hatch (Sparkling Metal)


Offline Aye30

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One extra thing you can do when installing the leads or coil plugs onto the spark plugs, is to smear a little dielectiric grease into the boot. It  helps seal the boot from moisture and contaminates.


Offline TerryT

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One extra thing you can do when installing the leads or coil plugs onto the spark plugs, is to smear a little dielectiric grease into the boot. It  helps seal the boot from moisture and contaminates.

When/if using dielectric grease here, yes, the operativeI words Aye30 used are "smear" and "little". I would only respectfully add to smear the grease just around the lip and a littlle way into the boot. That's what I do when I use it. 

Funny enough, I have seen fewer subjects divide a workshop floor than the use of "dielectric grease". It's either the The Best Thing Ever or The Devil's Tool.  :)
« Last Edit: September 03, 2023, 03:38:10 by TerryT »
  • 2018 i30 PD SR Auto 1.6 Turbo Hatch (Sparkling Metal)


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